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Teachers as peddlers of culture

Teachers as pedlars of culture

04APR

Paulo Freire described teachers as cultural workers in a monograph entitled “teachers as cultural workers – letters to those who dare teach”.

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His context was Danish teachers and their role in increasing awareness of inter-culturalism in their classrooms and in society. When thinking about clinical educators, one can also conceive of them as cultural workers.  They are both representatives of and performers within various intersecting professional and organisational cultures. The words they use, the way they present themselves, the manner in which they dress, their disposition with other professions and so on, are all representations of culture.  In terms of organisational culture teachers wear identification badges indicating belonging, role and rank.  Where and how teachers teach is dictated by organisational norms and regulations. The teaching approaches used and the words selected are all likely to be very much and formed by professional culture and norms.  Teachers are also unwitting conduits of clinical and professional educational culture from those who taught them, those that they work with etc to the student audiences that they engage with.  They share values and practices without necessarily thinking about where such values and practices came from.  They are just taken for granted.  They represent things that the teacher “just knows”. 

Have a think next time you find yourself teaching in the clinical setting about the messages that are communicated by your clothes, The physical positions that you occupy, the gestures that you use, your favourite words and phrases, the stories that you tell (and the ones that you do not tell),your positioning vis-a-vis patients and professional colleagues.  You may, on reflection, be able to delineate the meanings that you want to communicate, but how will you know the meanings, (cultural messages) that have been construed by students?  

How can we shake ourselves into awareness as we teach?

 
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Posted by on 04/04/2014 in Uncategorized

 

Teachers as pedlars of culture

Paulo Freire described teachers as cultural workers in a monograph entitled “teachers as cultural workers – letters to those who dare teach”.

Image

His context was Danish teachers and their role in increasing awareness of inter-culturalism in their classrooms and in society. When thinking about clinical educators, one can also conceive of them as cultural workers.  They are both representatives of and performers within various intersecting professional and organisational cultures. The words they use, the way they present themselves, the manner in which they dress, their disposition with other professions and so on, are all representations of culture.  In terms of organisational culture teachers wear identification badges indicating belonging, role and rank.  Where and how teachers teach is dictated by organisational norms and regulations. The teaching approaches used and the words selected are all likely to be very much and formed by professional culture and norms.  Teachers are also unwitting conduits of clinical and professional educational culture from those who taught them, those that they work with etc to the student audiences that they engage with.  They share values and practices without necessarily thinking about where such values and practices came from.  They are just taken for granted.  They represent things that the teacher “just knows”. 

Have a think next time you find yourself teaching in the clinical setting about the messages that are communicated by your clothes, The physical positions that you occupy, the gestures that you use, your favourite words and phrases, the stories that you tell (and the ones that you do not tell),your positioning vis-a-vis patients and professional colleagues.  You may, on reflection, be able to delineate the meanings that you want to communicate, but how will you know the meanings, (cultural messages) that have been construed by students?  

How can we shake ourselves into awareness as we teach?

 
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Posted by on 04/04/2014 in Uncategorized

 

GAME

Hi everyone,

I have posted the slides below from Natalie Lafferty’s recent game presentation on trends and approaches to medical education in the digital age. She gave an excellent presentation highlighting the limits of blackboard and demonstrating the potential of web 2.0 technologies. The slides give some flavour of what Natalie was saying. If you would like to learn more and stay in communication with you can follow her on Twitter @nlafferty .

You can also follow the hash tag that she oversees #UKmeded that covers a wide variety of medical education topics. She is also a participant and promoter of Free Open Access Mededucation which is an international collaboration linking lots of free medical education resources through blogs, Twitter feeds, YouTube videos Google docs etc – you can add the hash tag #FOAMed to your twitter feeds to follow their activities. You can also look at their website http://lifeinthefastlane.com/foam/ which has hundreds of links to all sorts of resources, teams and educators all over the world.

One aspect of Natalie’s work is to promote students as creators of medical education resources – have a look at an example of one project in which students arrange twitter conferences here:

http://mededelearning.wordpress.com/

Here are some of Natalie’s views on medical education blogging and other matters. It also will introduce you to a resource that allows you to share your slides internationally, i.e. eLime

http://www.slideshare.net/eLime

Finally, may I also introduce Anne-Marie Cunningham who works closely with Natalie on various Web 2.0 projects. This is her blog site she visits it with new postings several times a year. Anne-Marie is always worth reading and responding to.

http://wishfulthinkinginmedicaleducation.blogspot.ie/

Peter Cantillon

From: Boland, Josephine
Sent: 07 March 2013 17:47
To: St John, Una
Cc: Cantillon, Peter
Subject: GAME

Hi Una

Natalie’s GAME presentation from today

Josephine

Dr. Josephine A. Boland
Senior Lecturer in Education
School of Medicine

Clinical Science Institute (Room 313)

National University of Ireland, Galway
Tel + 353 (0)91 493857
Email: josephine.boland

Link: http://about.me/bolandjosephine

GAME-Galway7Mar13.pptx

 
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Posted by on 11/03/2013 in Uncategorized

 

SBA MCQ

Hi everyone

Here are the slides from Andrew Murphy’s presentation recently on writing and quality assuring single best answer assessments. The link to the Case and Swanson booklet on writing single best answer questions in the basic and clinical sciences is here:

http://www.nbme.org/pdf/itemwriting_2003/2003iwgwhole.pdf

all the best

Peter

GAMEMCQFeb25th2013.pptx

 
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Posted by on 05/03/2013 in Uncategorized

 

GAME 3 December 2012

Hi everyone,

GAME 3 was an update on assessment provided by Yvonne Finn, Josephine Boland and Andrew Murphy. They had all attended the annual St Georges Advanced Assessment Course and each one was tasked with bringing back one or two key messages to share with the school. The St Georges course brings together many of the leaders in healthcare education assessment worldwide and as such represents a great opportunity to be exposed to the cutting-edge of developments in assessment.

Yvonne spoke about the centrality of validity in considerations of assessment. There are several forms of validity of which the most important is construct validity that is that the test is measuring the construct, (feature of performance) that it is setting out to test. For example a single best answer test might be a valid measure of knowledge and the ability to apply knowledge in context. It would not be a valid measure of a complex physical skills such as taking blood pressure, wound closure etc. In practice the line between a test being developed and invalid is much finer than in this example. In many written tests students are awarded for being able to interpret and write English as well as their ability to synthesise knowledge in the context of question or problem.

Josephine argued for a programmatic approach to the planning of assessment. By programmatic she means that assessment should not be planned in isolation. Rather assessment should be planned in the context of an assessment strategy for an entire year and a whole curriculum. She also spoke of the importance of balancing assessment of learning and assessment for learning, (i.e. formative assessment). Whilst ensuring that students have adequate knowledge and skills to progress assessment also represents an extraordinary important opportunity for giving feedback and enhancing student performance. We ought therefore to give frequent formative and information rich feedback in a strategy of student centred longitudinal assessment. In order for this to work we need regular formative assessments interspersed between summative assessment events. We also need to give feedback for all of our assessments, (that includes summative assessments).

The presentations by Yvonne and Josephine are available below via the two PowerPoint hyperlinks. There are also additional materials related to each the presentations.

Professor Peter Cantillon
Discipline of General Practice
NUI, Galway, Ireland
Telephone + 353 91 492262 or
Telephone + 353 91 495192
Mobile + 353 87 6593930
http://www.nuigalway.ie/general_practice/education.html
GAME 5.12.2012.pptx
GAME Dec 2012_ from st georges.pptx
Identifying and prioritising opportunities for formative feedback.docx
A programmatic approach to assessment_GAME Dec 2012.docx
Examiner training domain-based.pdf
P Year OSCE Blueprint – July 2012.pdf

 
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Posted by on 24/12/2012 in Uncategorized

 

GAME 2 2012-13 Questions – A vital tool in the teacher’s toolbox

Hi everyone

Game 2 was about questioning. Questions are an educational tool technique that we use every day without thinking about it much. Yet questions and how we use them have a profound effect on the learning environment that we create and the sort of learning that our students can achieve. I have attached the PowerPoint slides from the game 2 meeting. In addition I would like to recommend that you look at the attached brief and practical article on questioning from the medical Journal of Australia as well as the more considered nursing article on questioning as a teaching tool.

Peter

Professor Peter Cantillon
Discipline of General Practice
NUI, Galway, Ireland
Telephone + 353 91 492262 or
Telephone + 353 91 495192
Mobile + 353 87 6593930

http://www.nuigalway.ie/general_practice/education.html

061112 Questioning for Learning.ppt

Questions.pdf

Questioning techniques.pdf

 
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Posted by on 08/11/2012 in Uncategorized

 

What’s Hot – Report from ASME and AMEE 2012 Conferences

Hi everyone
Maureen Kelly and I have provided a summary of some of the highlights from AMEE (association of medical educators in Europe, 3300 delegates) and ASME (association for the study of medical education, UK, 400 delegates) 2012 conferences. Please click on the links to our presentations below.

These excellent conferences are held in July (ASME) and August, (AMEE) each year. If you have an interest in medical education and would like to learn more try attending at least one of them next year. The links are below

http://www.asme.org.uk/

http://www.amee.org/index.asp

Peter Cantillon
ASME 2012.ppt
AMEE 2012.pptx

 
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Posted by on 06/10/2012 in Uncategorized

 
 
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